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biography of lyndon johnson "the passage of power" "the years of lyndon johnson". this book has been nominated for the national book critics circle award in biography. it is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. that was such a wonderful introduction, a wonderful introduction. it reminds me what lyndon johnson used to say. and parents were alive to hear it. and his father would have loved it. and his mother would have believed it. when winston churchill was writing his great biography, and i am working on the system of four volumes. i am not comparing myself to winston churchill but in regard to the lyndon johnson biography we are in the same vote. people ask me don't you get bored? the answer is the very opposite is true. for one reason, i don't think of these books as being about lyndon johnson just as i didn't think the power brokers being about robert moses. i never had the slightest interest in writing a book just to tell the life of the famous man. from the moment i first thought of doing books, and fought of biographies as a wave examining the great forces that shaped the
." c-span: in the fourth book the pass of power. you talk about the tension between lyndon johnson and robert kennedy. five gus background when they met and why there was so much hatred. >> guest: the first time they met it was fascinating. lyndon johnson is the powerful majority leader of the -- for center of joseph mccarthy and the committee. the -- how do we know what happened the first time they met? with him told me the same story. he had breakfast every morning johnson in the senate cafeteria and joe mccarthy had the round table near the cashiers' register he would sit with the staffers. johnson walks in one morning and mccarthy was there including bobby kennedy. and mccarthy jumps in deference to johnson except robert kennedy. he sits there. and johnson walks over to the table and shakes hand and sees bobby kennedy isn't getting up and johnson knows how to handle any situation like that. he stands there as it's described to me like this. and forcing robert kennedy to get up. and george reiding said there was no reason for it. two dogs come to the room and the hair rises on t
that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a horse since the day he got here. and thanks to carlin's leadership, thanks to marvin pinkert who he calls the genius behind the development of the new space, all of us as citizens can far better experience our history. as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen i value this place deeply. it's ve
has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen, i value this place deeply. it's very, very important. your participation is urged because it's a good thing and for an additional reason, that my vocal chords may fail sometimes but i'm going to go for it, and let's hope i can keep on talking. the two days -- no. i want to add one more thing about the archives. john said it, and it's true. people like me, who want to research american history, are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i, and my research assistants, including josh is
with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
-in that are tragedies. i mean you have john f. kennedy being killed in dallas and lyndon johnson quickly being sworn in. or when warren harding tied and coolidge sworn in. there are many examples of that. the simplicity of this, the fact that the weather is good. this is important that we remind ourselves today that we are all americans. we're not democrats. we're not republicans. we're not independents. this is our president for a second term >> pelley: there's so many rancor in an election immediately preceding an inauguration and so much rancor as policy gets to be made. inauguration day is a 24-hour period when that all seems to be put away >> one hopes so. we live in these you know, just terrible partisan times right now. but let's put the bickering aside. i think the fun of tomorrow is going to be guessing what's the president going to say? it's going to be 50 years this year of the "i have a dream speech" of martin luther king. 150 years of the emancipation proclamation. they have this historic african-american president. once again he said barack hussein obama today. using his middle name like
of the "wall street journal." joe califano, once an aid to lyndon johnson. taylor branch, author of a new book on race. and james peterson of lehigh university. we'll round it out with the newest brother act in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air, dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe, architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria, where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning, bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated
that are favorite stories is the lyndon b. johnson story so when we went to those archives, there were tapes while johnson had the same tapes going but they kept him hidden until two or three years ago in our book was one of the first ones that have access to the tapes. now lyndon johnson famously was president when medicare passed in 1965. but johnson himself tells in his autobiography he was resisting medicare and he stopped it singlehandedly as the chair of the ways and means committee she could do that, then after the 1964 election which was a landslide for the democrats, there was a markup of the bill. there were three bills before the committee that the administration proposal cover hospital care, the proposal just covered doctors' care and another proposal which suggested let's not cover people over 65 let's cover poor people. she was the great an antagonist of medicare and he sits back and says let's pass all three. the officials were at the time panicking what is he ought to and they go running by the way he says could you rewrite the bill and have it on my desk by 9:00 tomorrow morning.
in public spaces? >> i think very carefully, just as in navigated the relationship with lyndon johnson. he went out of his way to avoid taking a public position opposed to johnson on the war or poverty issues. it was only after a great deal of deliberation, a great deal of time had passed, and when he felt like he could do nothing else other than take a public stance. that is what is going on in the black community today. i think all of us recognize that the energy has to come from the grassroots. that those of us who feel that the president needs to go further, and i think it barack obama were sitting here, he would say, yes, i like to go farther in terms of dealing with these issues of poverty and specific issues of the black community, but he would also say, you have to push me. that does not necessarily come from him deciding which are the greatest party as he has to deal with. just as johnson also said, look, i have a lot of priorities as president. if you love me to deal with is a voting rights issue, as king did in 1964 and 1965, you have to push me. king went out and helped stage t
lots of unexpected things. but our favorite story is the lyndon b. johnson story. so when we went to the archives, derrick tapes. remember the tapes that got nixon so much trouble? johnson had this thing keeps going, but they kept them hidden. they didn't release to the public till two or three years ago and our book was one of the first that had access to these tapes. now lyndon johnson famously was that when medicare passed in 1965 and the normal story that johnson himself tells in his autobiography goes like this. representative wilbur mills was fighting, resisting medicare. he stopped he single-handedly and as chair of the ways and means committee could do that. after the 1964 election, and insight for the democrats, he stated that the last day of the markup of the bill. there's three bills before the committee. administration proposal which covered hospital care. the ama proposal, which discover doctors care that another proposal, which suggested let's not cover all people over 65. vicious cover poor people. the great antagonist of medicare sits back and says let's pass all t
with democratic leaders, lyndon johnson. i talked with the brookings scholar who was a young aide in the eisenhower white house. he said eisenhower was deeply not do anything. an and lbj but he knew to make things work you had to have this getting along. the key difference here is johnson, rayburn, o'neal, they could deliver. this president does not have someone who can deliver and in the senate, republicans have abused the fill bupser. -- filibuster. >> describe eisenhower? >> he was devious. >> he was the most devious person nixon had ever known. you said, i mean that in a positive sense. >> they could work together. >> reagan was not actually dealing with a house my majority, -- minority, that there was a conservative majority in the house. when you add the republicans and conservative democrats. what we had was ideological sorting since then of the the parties were nor geographical. nowadays if you're conservative, you're republican. if you're a liberal, you're a democrat. obama is up against an actual majority of conservative house members. reagan didn't have to face a majori
problems that need to be solved. but you know, all of you or most of you are experts on lyndon johnson that my reading of your book and others about lyndon johnson, yes, is that he was always engaged. and sometimes people didn't like him but even people who disagreed with him kind of liked his energy and his engagement. he could call these people and say i've got to have your vote because of that engagement. oba sll has not crossed that threshold where he is engaged individually, not just with the leaders in the republican party but the leaders in his own party. >> rose: the first question is that part of his dna, you know. and even his core competence to do that. my second point is does he believe it's effective. i don't know if i believe what he says it accomplished objectives. >> it may be with the republicans that it wasn't able to accomplish the objective. that he himself has said he plays golf with boehner but then nothing happened after that. but i think he still has room to get the democrats in those rooms more, to bring them over more, to keep his own base happy and going. i
, eisenhower worked quietly behind the scenes with the senate majority leader, lyndon johnson, to gain approval of his legislative agenda. ronald reagan developed a close relationship with the democratic speaker of the house tip o'neill, to somehow fulfill his legislative goals, compromise as they were. it might be cynical to postulate that some of nixon's rather liberal legislations forays were prompted by his desire to get along with a democratic-controlled congress. woodrow wilson was the target of republican party that wanted to even many a squabble they had with the president. he defeated both william howard taft and theodore roosevelt to win his first term. he spearheaded liberal legislation they opposed, and got approval of the league of nations that would be selected to vent republican party hostility to wilson. the treaty was never approved. the votes were there for approval, but the president allowed compromise, but wilson stood firm. it was the president, not congress, that refused to compromise. one of the most successful relationships between a president and congress occurred durin
with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've been in jail. he won the nobel prize and he's still in jail in selma on the right to vote. and the aids simply told dr. king you've got to say you had a purpose. let's say that you're coming out of jail to meet with the president. and that infuriated lyndon johnson because he said nobody in the expense of here in the middle of a controversy. i'm trying to run the country. but on the matter and, he didn't want to say i won't meet with dr. martin luther king partly because he shared the goal of cutting the voting rights bill. so with the work of was kind of an ego where they said dr. king was officially coming up to
is the king of them all so it's a little bit of a -- lyndon johnson picked up a couple. lyndon johnson and again i'm using every authority i can find. but lyndon johnson i'm sure he picked this up from -- but pressing the flesh was johnson-ism. i will be down there in a flash and lady bird gets credit for motorcade. didn't exist before she comes up with motorcade and it's picked up by "time" magazine. there is no elise written example that has been used before. richard nixon has some nice ones. depending on your point of view. the silent majority is his and excellent ability is a coinage that either he or his speechwriters when they're going over the records of the watergate they use that term. if something is censored or bleeped its deleted which became its own curse word. another one which was really interesting is when he started talking about winding down the war. and winding down seemed to be sort of a winding up. it created some real response at that time. george herbert walker bush came up with new world order which was his. he got that from somewhere else that made it his own a
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger. it's easy to point to the national security or economic consequences impact on the ratings have been i
's a little bit of -- um, lyndon johnson had some nice ones, but lyndon johnson picked up a couple -- lyndon johnson, again, i'm using every authority i can find, but i'm sure he picked this up. pressing the flesh was a johnsonism. i'll be down there pressing the flesh. and ladybird gets credit for motorcade. that doesn't exist before she comes up with motorcade, and it's picked up by "time" magazine. there's no at least written example of that being used before that. um, richard nixon has some nice ones. he -- depending on your point of view -- but silent majority is his, deleted a coinage of his speech writers when they're going over the records of the watergate, their use of term instead of saying censored they used the term expletive deleted which became its own sort of curse word. another one which was very interesting at the time, created quite a stir was when he talked about, started talking about winding down the war and winding down seemed to be sort of -- you know, we're winding up, it was few to american ears and created -- it was new to american ears and created some real respons
president to be sworn in by a woman? president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street now, and we're going to talk to a woman who knows a thing or two about money. our good friend suze orman is with us. we're going to speak with her after this. ♪ ng, and teaching it took to earn it. so we give you the power to keep as much of your hard-earned money as possible. our customized interview covers everything from a service member's deployment, to a student's loan interest, right down to a teacher's crayons. you've worked hard to earn your money. we're here to help you keep it. turbotax-- the power to keep what's yours. t
of someone like franklin delano roosevelt, john f. kennedy, lyndon johnson, these were political figures who believed in what we now would call the traditional family. they believe in a male breadwinner family, largely a male was largely responsible for supporting the families economically. and so on. that was really still part of the liberal idea, and that idea was challenge in the '60s, particularly by feminism and by the gay and lesbian rights movement. but also in some interesting ways by the civil rights and black power movement. who essentially said that model of the family had -- is heterosexual, it's patriarchal, it's white, and so on. it doesn't really represent the full breath of american families in the way that americans actually live their lives. and that was a deep challenge to liberalism itself. it's one of the precipitating event, one of the precipitating forces that creates this crisis in liberalism in the 1960s. it's not by any means the only one but it is a pretty major one. one of the most interesting examples that i use in the book, and i think one of the most critical h
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
. >> surely finding osama bin laden, surely passing civil rights legislation as lyndon johnson was able to do and before that, surely defeating the nazis was a much more formidable task than taking on the gun lobby. >> so if we can defeat the germans in world war ii, i guess the n.r.a. is supposed to be-- is that what he's saying? >> right, he's giving himself a little bit of wiggle room. i didn't exactly compare the nra to the nazis, stew $them in the same spot and let the audience sort it out. we're sure to see, on gun owners opponents of gun control and language when you see words likenazis. george orwell in 1946 a famous essay, the word fascism should only be used for people with hitler and-- that was 1946, 70 years later we're still doing it. >> jon: do you see it differently, judy? >> not really, i thought that schieffer was very close to the line of advocacy as opposed to reading the news and being straight about a news story. i do think that even though there was no direct comparison there's clearly an inference that the n.r.a. is equivalent to the nazis and raises questions whether o
to the end of it. >> you can make argument against term limits. but lyndon johnson understood, he had a few months. just a few months. that's when he got voting rights done. that's when he got a lot of those major pieces of great society legislation done, was in those months of 1965. medicare, all that. and so, i think we're likely to see a lot of activity right now. >> on immigration, guns, debt. all coming up. we're going to get that all day long here. >>> i want to go back to josh elliott on pennsylvania avenue. you're giving us a little weather, right, josh? >> it's a beautiful day. you were speaking of the battle lines drawn. let today stand as it is, an oasis of unity. one that is brisk but sunny. we want to thank our sam champion dearly for the weather we have in the nation's capital today, sam. >> just because it could have been worse. we've had everything. it's the topic all politicians and news folks will agree on today. washington's weather regularly changes in january. ronald reagan had the warmest and the coldest inauguration day. 55 degrees, and the coldest ever, 7 degrees in
for so many of us, you talk about a guy like lyndon johnson who made it very clear he knew he was writing off the south for the next 30 or 40 years by pushing the kinds of programs he pushed, the war on poverty. let me ask you a question i was going to ask the congress wouldn't -- the congresswoman. i will ask you, have the democrats abandoned for people -- poor people? have they abandoned the issue of poverty? >> you want me to defend them? i am going to come down hard. >> thank you so much. let me say two things. i am not owned by anybody. no corporation or anything else. let me say that democrats have been a lot of ways written off poverty. i disagree with that. it is no thing to do with guns. the congressional black caucus has taken this up year after year. no one fights for more people more than they fight for poor people. no one fight the battle, even the congressional black caucus, which was basically able to hold off on the last vote because of this spirit of people understand we say, how did you pay for this? they pay for it by cutting things like dialysis and renal failure treat
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 285 (some duplicates have been removed)

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